Inaugural Marikana Memorial Lecture

Judge President John Hlophe calls for 16 August to be observed as South Africa’s workers’ day in commemoration of the Marikana Massacre
To mark the 6th anniversary of the Marikana Massacre, Judge President John Hlophe, of the Western Cape Division of the High Court of South Africa, delivered a key note address at the inaugural Marikana Massacre Commemoration Memorial Lecture on 15 August 2018 at the Sandton Convention Centre. The event, hosted by the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU), included speakers such as Political Analyst Ralph Mathekga, Advocate Dali Mpofu and AMCU President Joseph Mathunjwa.

The lecture was held in memory and in commemoration of the 37 mineworkers who lost their lives during a massacre at the Lonmin Platinum Mine in Marikana on 16 August 2012, following a week-long protest by workers demanding a wage increase. In his speech Judge President Hlophe said “The dictionary is very clear that a massacre is the killing of many people. There are many similarities between the 1960 Sharpville Massacre, the 1976 Soweto Youth Uprising and the 2012 Marikana Massacre. Marikana however, happened right under the nose of our democratically elected government. Marikana, in my mind, was nothing more than a normal labour dispute. Workers were not satisfied with their working conditions, their safety at work and most importantly their minimum wage, and therefore took to protest. Unfortunately, it was allowed to escalate out of control. 37 of the workers were killed. It is no more than what it is – it is a massacre.”

All the speakers shared the same sentiments; that 16 August should be observed as South Africa’s Worker’s Day. Guest speaker, Ralph Mathekga said, “Marikana is a democratic tragedy – there is no diplomatic way of putting it. That day human rights were disrespected. The most fundamental rights being the right to live, the right to dignity and the right to withhold labour. Until this day, nobody has been prosecuted, and South Africa is quiet. My biggest worry is that South Africa sees Marikana as an ordinary atrocity, a misunderstanding – and not for exactly what it is – a Massacre”.

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6th Marikana Lecture

Judge President John Hlophe calls for 16 August to be observed as South Africa’s workers’ day in commemoration of the marikana massacre
To mark the 6th anniversary of the Marikana Massacre, Judge President John Hlophe, of the Western Cape Division of the High Court of South Africa, delivered a key note address at the inaugural Marikana Massacre Commemoration Memorial Lecture on 15 August 2018 at the Sandton Convention Centre. The event, hosted by the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU), included speakers such as Political Analyst Ralph Mathekga, Advocate Dali Mpofu and AMCU President Joseph Mathunjwa.

The lecture was held in memory and in commemoration of the 37 mineworkers who lost their lives during a massacre at the Lonmin Platinum Mine in Marikana on 16 August 2012, following a week-long protest by workers demanding a wage increase. In his speech Judge President Hlophe said “The dictionary is very clear that a massacre is the killing of many people. There are many similarities between the 1960 Sharpville Massacre, the 1976 Soweto Youth Uprising and the 2012 Marikana Massacre. Marikana however, happened right under the nose of our democratically elected government. Marikana, in my mind, was nothing more than a normal labour dispute. Workers were not satisfied with their working conditions, their safety at work and most importantly their minimum wage, and therefore took to protest. Unfortunately, it was allowed to escalate out of control. 37 of the workers were killed. It is no more than what it is – it is a massacre.”

All the speakers shared the same sentiments; that 16 August should be observed as South Africa’s Worker’s Day. Guest speaker, Ralph Mathekga said, “Marikana is a democratic tragedy – there is no diplomatic way of putting it. That day human rights were disrespected. The most fundamental rights being the right to live, the right to dignity and the right to withhold labour. Until this day, nobody has been prosecuted, and South Africa is quiet. My biggest worry is that South Africa sees Marikana as an ordinary atrocity, a misunderstanding – and not for exactly what it is – a Massacre”.

Event Gallery